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About our Breeds

English Bulldog

General Appearance

The perfect Bulldog must be of medium size and smooth coat; with heavy, thick-set, low-swung body, massive short-faced head, wide shoulders and sturdy limbs. The general appearance and attitude should suggest great stability, vigor and strength. The disposition should be equable and kind, resolute and courageous (not vicious or aggressive), and demeanor should be pacific and dignified. These attributes should be countenanced by the expression and behavior.

  bulldog with cape
Breed Standard

Size, Proportion, Symmetry
The size for mature dogs is about 50 pounds; for mature bitches about 40 pounds. The circumference of the skull in front of the ears should measure at least the height of the dog at the shoulders.

Color of Coat
The color of coat should be uniform, pure of its kind and brilliant. Solid black is very undesirable, but not so objectionable if occurring to a moderate degree in piebald patches. The brindles to be perfect should have a fine, even and equal distribution of the composite colors. In brindles and solid colors a small white patch on the chest is not considered detrimental.

Gait
The style and carriage are peculiar, his gait being a loose-jointed, shuffling, sidewise motion, giving the characteristic "roll." The action must, however, be unrestrained, free and vigorous.

Temperament
The disposition should be equable and kind, resolute and courageous (not vicious or aggressive), and demeanor should be pacific and dignified. These attributes should be countenanced by the expression and behavior.

History

History

The Bulldog, to the best of our knowledge, had its origin in the British Isles. The name "bull" was applied because of the dog's use in the sport of bull baiting, which was extremely cruel. The original Bulldog had to be very ferocious and so savage and courageous as to be almost insensitive to pain.

In 1835 dog fighting as a sport became illegal in England. Therefore, the English Bulldog had outlived his usefulness and his days were numbered. However, there were dog lovers who felt deep disappointment at the passing of the bred, and they set themselves the task of preserving it. They proceeded to eliminate the undesirable fierce characteristics and to preserve and accentuate the finer qualities. Within a few generations, the English Bulldog became one of the finest physical specimens, minus its original viciousness.

We may be justly proud of the Bulldog we know today, and we must express our gratitude to our British cousins, who realized the value of the English Bull sufficiently to preserve him for posterity.

  bulldog reading

Cares

Care and Exercise

Regular brushing with a rough cloth and minimal exercise. Care should be taken not to over feed as he would prefer not to take any exercise. Special care to powder his fold and wrinkles and under his tail during hot weather. Should not be over exerted in hot weather. He does not make a good dog for the obedience enthusiast.

Health Issues:
Never leave this dog in a hot car or hot, unventilated area -- they easily overheat. The English Bulldog does drool and snore.

  taking a bath

French Bulldog

General Appearance

The French Bulldog has the appearance of an active, intelligent, muscular dog of heavy bone, smooth coat, compactly built, and of medium or small structure. Expression alert, curious and interested. Any alteration other than removal of dewclaws is considered mutilation and is a disqualification. Proportion and symmetry. All points are well distributed and bear good relation one to the other; no feature being in such prominence from either excess or lack of quality that the animal appears poorly proportioned. Influence of sex. In comparing specimens of different sex, due allowance is to be made in favor of bitches, which do not bear the characteristics of the breed to the same marked degree as do the dogs.

 

 

Breed Standard

The French Bulldog has the appearance of an active, intelligent, muscular dog of heavy bone, smooth coat, compactly built, and of medium or small structure. Expression alert, curious and interested. Any alteration other than removal of dewclaws is considered mutilation and is a disqualification. Proportion and symmetry. All points are well distributed and bear good relation one to the other; no feature being in such prominence from either excess or lack of quality that the animal appears poorly proportioned. Influence of sex. In comparing specimens of different sex, due allowance is to be made in favor of bitches, which do not bear the characteristics of the breed to the same marked degree as do the dogs.

Size, Proportion, Substance
Weight. Not to exceed 28 pounds; over 28 pounds is a disqualification. Proportion. Distance from withers to ground in good relation to distance from withers to onset of tail, so that animal appears compact, well-balanced and in good proportion. Substance. Muscular, heavy bone.

Coat
Coat is moderately fine, brilliant, short and smooth. Skin is soft and loose, especially at the head and shoulders, forming wrinkles.

Color
Acceptable colors: all brindle, fawn, white, brindle and white and any color except those which constitute disqualification. All colors are acceptable with exception of solid black, mouse, liver, black and tan, black and white and white and black which are disqualifications. Black means black without a trace of brindle.

Gait
Correct gait is double tracking with reach and drive; the action is unrestrained, free and vigorous.

Over 28 pounds in weight.
History
     

The French Bulldog first appeared in the United States in 1896 at the Westminster Kennel Club's show in New York. He soon became known as "Frenchie," a name that stuck with him. He was a small to medium-size dog weighing under twenty-eight pounds with short hair and a muscular build. He was essentially a pocket-sized edition of the Bulldog, or English Bulldog as some people insist on calling them. However, his bat-like ears, held erect, his small size and his activeness set him apart from the Bulldog. He had a lively expression and a disposition described by some as roguish and fun loving . He's been referred to as "a clown in the cloak of a philosopher."

  bulldog with a cape
 

In the late 1800's the Bulldog had long had a reputation for strength and tenacity, sterling qualities in those days of sail, which was appreciated by seafaring men the world over. So it is not surprising that French seamen engaged in cross channel trade took a shine to them. Some Bulldogs in the south of England were known to be smaller than usual. It is generally thought that seamen liked the small size dogs because they were easier to smuggle aboard ship and keep out of sight during the trip back to France. During the same period, lace workers in the south of England, displaced by machines in the industrial revolution, moved to France in large numbers to practice their trade and took their "toy Bulldogs" with them. Thus many small Bulldogs found their way across the channel as pets.

In France, they became the dandies of "Ladies of the Night" and were quite popular in Paris, often being depicted in brothels by artist of that day. American tourist discovered the little French Bulldog and began bringing them home.

Cares

Allergies
The common signs of allergy are: continuous licking and chewing of the foot, rubbing the face, trying to rub the ears (inflammation of the ear), and watery eyes. The four major categories of allergy are flea allergy, airborne allergy, food allergy, and contact allergy.

Ear cleaning
A dog's ear canals are longer than ours and typically produce more wax. They tend to get infected more often, particularly in breeds with floppy and/or hairy ears.

 

Exercise
French Bulldogs need room for growing, particularly the hips and their articulations. Avoid while the French Bulldog is young: forced jumping exercises, stairs, jumping up on beds, because vertical movements can give increased pressure on the surfaces of the cartilage of the articulations and consecutively hypersecretion of articular fluid and damage of the intra-articular cartilage. Swollen and painful articulations could follow, with deformation of the position of the legs. French Bulldogs may be considered as young, until they are around 18 months.

Food
A French Bulldog should be fed a quality brand of dry or all natural meat diet. It is up to you as the owner, breeder to decide what type of diet you will feed. What is good for one may be awful for another .

Heat
French Bulldogs are very sensitive to overheating. Never leave them alone in a car. Avoid exercise during the hot summer period. If your dog shows signs of overheating, wipe him with wet, fresh towels, fan him and give him some fresh water.

Nose
From time to time you can put a little vaseline on the nose of your French Bulldog in order to avoid it from becoming dry. The nose of any breed of dog may be cool and or wet, but you want to be aware of the warm dry nose, this may mean that your pet is not well and you should take temp and then call the vet

Yorkie Terrier

General Appearance

That of a long-haired toy terrier whose blue and tan coat is parted on the face and from the base of the skull to the end of the tail and hangs evenly and quite straight down each side of body. The body is neat, compact and well proportioned. The dog's high head carriage and confident manner should give the appearance of vigor and self-importance.

Breed Standard

Head

Small and rather flat on top, the skull not too prominent or round, the muzzle not too long, with the bite neither undershot nor overshot and teeth sound. Either scissors bite or level bite is acceptable. The nose is black. Eyes are medium in size and not too prominent; dark in color and sparkling with a sharp, intelligent expression. Eye rims are dark. Ears are small, V-shaped, carried erect and set not too far apart.

Body Well proportioned and very compact. The back is rather short, the back line level, with height at shoulder the same as at the rump. Legs and Feet Forelegs should be straight, elbows neither in nor out. Hind legs straight when viewed from behind, but stifles are moderately bent when viewed from the sides. Feet are round with black toenails. Dewclaws, if any, are generally removed from the hind legs. Dewclaws on the forelegs may be removed. Tail Docked to a medium length and carried slightly higher than the level of the back. Coat Quality, texture and quantity of coat are of prime importance. Hair is glossy, fine and silky in texture. Coat on the body is moderately long and perfectly straight (not wavy). It may be trimmed to floor length to give ease of movement and a neater appearance, if desired. The fall on the head is long, tied with one bow in center of head or parted in the middle and tied with two bows. Hair on muzzle is very long. Hair should be trimmed short on tips of ears and may be trimmed on feet to give them a neat appearance.

Colors Puppies are born black and tan and are normally darker in body color, showing an intermingling of black hair in the tan until they are matured. Color of hair on body and richness of tan on head and legs are of prime importance in adult dogs, to which the following color requirements apply: Blue: Is a dark steel-blue, not a silver-blue and not mingled with fawn, bronzy or black hairs.

Tan

All tan hair is darker at the roots than in the middle, shading to still lighter tan at the tips. There should be no sooty or black hair intermingled with any of the tan. Color on Body The blue extends over the body from back of neck to root of tail. Hair on tail is a darker blue, especially at end of tail. Headfall A rich golden tan, deeper in color at sides of head, at ear roots and on the muzzle, with ears a deep rich tan. Tan color should not extend down on back of neck. Chest and Legs A bright, rich tan, not extending above the elbow on the forelegs nor above the stifle on the hind legs. Weight Must not exceed seven pounds.

History

The Yorkshire Terrier traces to the Waterside Terrier, a small longish-coated dog, bluish-gray in color, weighing between 6 and 20 pounds (most commonly 10 pounds). The Waterside Terrier was a breed formed by the crossing of the old rough-coated Black-and-Tan English Terrier (common in the Manchester area) and the Paisley and Clydesdale Terriers. It was brought to Yorkshire by weavers who migrated from Scotland to England in the mid-19th century.

The Yorkshire Terrier made its first appearance at a bench show in England in 1861 as a "broken-haired Scotch Terrier". It became known as a Yorkshire Terrier in 1870 when, after the Westmoreland show, Angus Sutherland reported in The Field magazine that "they ought no longer be called Scotch Terriers, but Yorkshire Terriers for having been so improved there." The earliest record of a Yorkshire Terrier born in the United States dates to 1872.

Classes for the breed have been offered at all shows since 1878. Early shows divided the classes by weight - under 5 pounds and 5 pounds and over. Size, however, soon settled down to an average of between 3 and 7 pounds, resulting in only one class being offered in later shows. While a Toy, and at various times a greatly pampered one, the Yorkshire is a spirited dog that definitely shows its terrier strain. The show dog's length of coat makes constant care necessary to protect it from damage, but the breed is glad to engage in all the roistering activities of the larger terrier breeds.

Cares

Feeding
It is best to feed your puppy the food your breeder recommends for at least two weeks. If you want to feed your puppy a higher grade or natural grade of dog food start by mixing the new dog food with the present dog food at a 3 to 1 ratio for 5 days. Then mix the dog foods at a 1 to 1 ratio for another 5 days. Next mix the dog foods at a 1 to 3 ratio and feed for 5 days. Now you can feed your yorkie the new dog food without mixing in the old dog food. Yorkie puppies should eat 3-4 times per day. If you have difficulty with your baby not eating add a bit of warm water. At 12-24 months change to an adult dog food for Yorkshire Terriers. Keep treats and people food to a minimum, (one treat I use is honey nut cheerios) you will only have difficult eater if you over do anything. Keep fresh food and water out at all times (at least until the yorkie is 1 year old). If your yorkie gets a bit stressed add a tsp of honey to fresh drinking water.

Napping
Yes, taking a nap is just as important, if not more important for a yorkie puppy as it is for children. The size the puppy is one of the factors that determine how often the puppy needs to rest. The naps help the yorkie build back its reserve.

Bathing
It is necessary to bathe your puppy anywhere from once a week to once a month. The environment, type of haircut, and quality of coat all affect how often your new puppy needs to take a bath. Any good shampoo and conditioner will do. While the yorkie is still wet we recommend that his/her coat be combed with any good quality comb. Once their hair has been combed use a blow dryer to dry their hair.

Grooming
Daily brushing is recommended to maintain the coat and keep it mat free. When brushing, never brush a dry coat, spray your brush with mixture of water and conditioner then brush him/her. Brushing will keep the hair clean, except on the side of the body where urine collects on a male. Wash this area daily with a damp cloth and warm water. Wash mucus from the corners of the dog's eyes, daily if needed, with a cloth or wad of cotton soaked in warm water. Mucus will rot your pet's hair if it's not removed. Dry your yorkie off carefully. Take special care to keep the hair around the Yorkie's anus clean. It is common for this hair to become matted with feces. Hair on his feet will need trimming occasionally.

Clipping nails
W
we use a standard nail clipper (for people) clip them at the hook no further if you cut short. Dog nail clipper will be needed as they age. Ears: Keep the hair on the top third of the earflaps trimmed very short. This way, excessive hair won't weigh down the ears before they are firmly "set," at around six months of age. If they droop the puppy's ears need to be taped. If you take your yorkie to be groomed, request the ears be shaved 1/3 down from the tip in an inverted v shape front and back, too much hair weights it causing an unnatural droop. Get your dog's ears checked regularly for excessive wax and mites, and ask your vet to pluck the hair from inside his ears. Teeth: Use a tooth brush and paste made for dogs available at all pet stores. Make sure you have the yorkie's teeth checked by a vet @ 6-8 months. Sometimes baby teeth need to be removed. We recommend to wait until the yorkie is at least 1 ½ years old before removing any baby teeth, unless the baby teeth are creating problems in which case we recommend the teeth be pulled upon you vets recommendation.